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Wish list for the caregiver?

The National Institutes of Health just released a paper on the needs of the caregiver "workforce." Here are some highlights from the report: Today family caregivers provide 80% of the care for persons with dementia. 16 million informal caregivers provide approximately 18 billion hours of unpaid care to persons with dementia. The value of the…

Halloween and Dementia: 4 Helpful Tips

Halloween marks the beginning of the fall and winter holidays. I will be posting more content about holidays and dementia. Here are some simple ideas and tips for CarePartners to  have a safe and sane (ok, as sane as possible) holiday. 1. Play to Your Loved One's Strengths The best way to have an enjoyable…

Dear Seagull: An Open Letter to Those Who Want to Question My Care

The next time you feel compelled to criticize or undermine my care, close your mouth and open your checkbook. 

What causes delirium in people with dementia?

People with dementia are at great risk for delirium, which is a sudden uptick in confusion and other behaviors.

Refusing Treatment for Someone with Dementia: Caregiver Knows Best (The Secret of Palliative Care)

Palliative care can include “end-of-life” or hospice care, but this narrow and incorrect understanding of palliative care restricts opportunities for important advanced care planning conversations to occur early in the disease process—AND TO INVOLVE THE PERSON WHO IS NOT QUITE YET DEEPLY FORGETFUL.

Can a Person with Dementia Safely Make Decisions?

The asking of the questions is a process; we are providing an opportunity to really find out what the other person is thinking. On one hand, we want to protect our loved ones from financial abuse or unsafe conditions. On the other hand, we want to respect their autonomy....their ability to make their own decisions. 

Decision-Making & Dementia: Dimmer versus Switch

When Mrs. Q's opinions differed from that of her granddaughter, the granddaughter quickly used the dementia diagnosis to ignore Mrs. Q's choices. When Mrs. Q's choices and opinions mirrored those of the granddaughter, the granddaughter believed that Mrs. Q had the capacity to make a decision. This isn't how decisional capacity works.