Crash Course in Dementia-Centric Communication

Dementia-Centric Communication Dementia-centric communication is the ability to interact with people who have dementia in a respectful and meaningful way. I hear, over and over again, "I don't know what to say to a person with dementia." "What if I do something wrong?" Fear not, I am here to help by providing some key points…

Is my spouse turning into a jerk or is it dementia?

Frontotemporal Dementia & The Jerk Factor When I say "dementia," most people think "Alzheimer's Disease." The truth is that in people under 65, the more common dementia is "frontotemporal dementia" for FTD. FTD refers to a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases that include behavioral, motor, and/or speech symptoms. The one I am talking about here is known as…

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Dementia and “Entering Their Reality:” Combining Elements of Truth with Preserving Dignity

Think of "Entering Their Reality" as a gentle and kind approach to delivering truth with dignity

Crankiness and Irritability in Persons with Dementia

There is a very good reason why people with dementia may seem more irritable or cranky: "laid off" workers!

Halloween and Dementia: 4 Helpful Tips

Halloween marks the beginning of the fall and winter holidays. I will be posting more content about holidays and dementia. Here are some simple ideas and tips for CarePartners to  have a safe and sane (ok, as sane as possible) holiday. 1. Play to Your Loved One's Strengths The best way to have an enjoyable…

Frontotemporal Dementia Caregiving Costs More than AD Caregiving

The combined indirect and direct care costs associated with FTD averaged $120K annually, compared to the average annual indirect and direct care costs of caregiving for AD, $64K. Flexible work schedules and pre-tax health savings accounts for caregiving expenses are two ideas that would make life better for family caregivers. 

The 3 Questions Every Dementia Caregiver Should Ask Clinicians: Starting the Palliative Care Conversation

We described palliative care as “aggressive symptom management for maximum quality of life at the present time.” The goal is to treat and remove, or reduce, symptoms that are bothering the person who is deeply forgetful.  Symptoms such as pain, or problems like urinary tract infections, are handled in ways that make sense to the person living in Dementia Land.